Adorations & Devotionals, History, Culture & Worship, Worship

Adorations for Dellingr of the Lakeside Breeze

When in the spring I began to walk, I encountered you, O Dellingr–
you, who was quiet, and tranquil, and who lifted the sun just above the lake
that sparkled with your light’s reflection. O Dellingr! I met you in the spring
and parted with you in the winter cold, and oh how I’ve missed you…!
I have longed to meet you again at the lakeside where I sat
and was soothed by the birdsong
and looked upon the shining waters
and became enraptured by the love I felt in my own heart
before you gave Dagr his reins and sent him to his mother.
O gentle god, O light reborn, O third lover and day-maker,
will you sit with me again?
Here at the lakeside,
will you fill my lungs with reverent words
and caress my cheek with your most calming breeze?
O dayspring, O Dellingr, please enchant me here,
and over and over,
and when I fall from the sight of this world,
let me fall upon a lakeside knoll
and sit with you again.

© Alixander F. D. Bragiteilen and Bragiteilen.com, 2018. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Alixander F. D. Bragiteilen and Bragiteilen.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
History, Culture & Worship, Quotations on Pre-Christian Spirituality

“Man Fears Time, But Time Fears the Pyramids” (Quotations on Pre-Christian Spirituality)

Pyramid_of_Djoser_2010
The Pyramid Of Djoser

This isn’t exactly a quotation on spirituality per se, but it does appeal to my spiritual sensibilities anyway, so I’m making it part of this series.

Earlier today, I was reading Handbook to Life in Ancient Mesopotamia, and I came across an Arab proverb that really resonated with me:

Man fears time, but time fears the pyramids.

This proverb reminds me of another quote by Muhammad Ali (January 17, 1942 – June 3, 2016) that shares the same spirit:

I hated every minute of training, but I said, ‘Don’t quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.

…And this quote in turn reminds me of one by Anita Roddick (October 23, 1942 – September 10, 2007):

If you do things well, do them better. Be daring, be first, be different, be just.

I interpret the Arab proverb to mean that decay and death are a fact of existence for human beings, but even so, humans can leave legacies that time has difficulty destroying. The earliest pyramid in Egypt is a step pyramid (a pyramid built out of progressively smaller “stepped” platforms, similar to Mesopotamian ziggurats, rather than the later pyramids with smooth sides) called the Pyramid of Djoser, constructed some 4,650 years ago, give or take a decade or so. Today, it still stands.

As the proverb implies, time has been unable to tear down the pyramids of Egypt. Each pyramid alone is a testament to the greatness of human endurance and the power of synergy, but the pyramids together are a testament to humankind’s ability to say “I have achieved inconceivable greatness before, and I will do it again and again.” It takes the concept of “impossible” and barrels through its walls, battering ram in its collective arms and declaring to what exists on the other side, “There is nothing in this universe that I cannot pull down from the heavens and grasp in my own mortal hands.”

Whatever you perceive as being your best, know that you are capable of better. No matter how long you toil, know that you can toil for another moment longer. For each successive piece of greatness that you manage to grasp, know that tomorrow, you will have an opportunity to reach higher. This is the miracle of being human: to be able to achieve the impossible, and then say, “Tomorrow I will achieve more.”

© Alixander F. D. Bragiteilen and Bragiteilen.com, 2018. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Alixander F. D. Bragiteilen and Bragiteilen.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
History, Culture & Worship, Relationships Between Gods and Mortals, U/SPG (Unverified/Shared Personal Gnosis), Worship, Worship Practices

Reintegrating the Gods into Daily Life: Matching Religion With Worldview and Ending Those Lonely Disconnects Between Us and Them

The Creation of Adam (detail) (Michelangelo)
The Creation of Adam (detail) (Michelangelo)

When in the early sixteenth century Michelangelo painted one of his greatest masterpieces, The Creation of Adam, the general concept of a man touching the hand of god was seen as a much loftier goal than it was to the pagan Romans of not much more than a thousand years before he was born. As far back as in the city of Eridu in Ancient Mesopotamia, and eventually slowing to a halt starting in Southern Europe, history has recorded the ordinary and the supernatural simultaneously, on the same pages and in the same sort of language. To the historians of yesteryear, and more importantly, to the common person, there was very little separation, if any, between the menial tasks of daily life and the divine interference of the gods, for the gods were present in all things. The loss of that presence is the reason for much of the loneliness experienced by modern polytheists, and it is something I have finally found the words with which to provide the solution.

As Ralph Metzner has stated, the separation of ordinary life from contact with the divine is a “loss [that] resulted from the gradually increasing emphasis, started by the Greeks and continued with Christianity, on abstract conceptions of deity rather than on the direct, sensory perception of and communication with spirits that was the norm in polytheistic animism.” Today, even with the reemergence of ancient polytheistic religions like Hellenic Polytheism, Religio Romana, Kemetism, and Germanic and Norse Heathenry, the West has yet to recover its old comfort with dining at the same table as the gods, among other things, and the religious “reemergences” I just mentioned are, for the most part, vague approximations at best, hampered by a worldview that dulls the senses which reveal the divine to mankind.

If humankind had retained regular contact with the divine and not grown the mental barriers between us and them that it has, we might today find the presence of many gods in the discovery of a parking ticket on the window shield of a car, in the modern understanding of GMOs, or even, as ridiculous as it sounds, in a toilet cleaner bomb. These things are simply the modern descendants of what the old gods once held dominion over. Finding Týr in a parking ticket today is conceptually no different than a person from a distant age finding him at The Thing, an ancient Norse gathering that occurred regularly to discuss the business of laying down and enforcing the law of the land.

Continue reading “Reintegrating the Gods into Daily Life: Matching Religion With Worldview and Ending Those Lonely Disconnects Between Us and Them”

Galdr & Seiðr How-To's, Runic Divination

My Method for Achieving the Best Possible Frame of Mind for Runic Divination (Bragiteilen’s Galdrbook)

Hans Erni - Tanzendes Paar mit Früchten im Haar (1952)
Tanzendes Paar mit Früchten im Haar (Hans Erni)

Hello again! Before I begin, I want to say that starting today with this post, I will be posting either weekly or once every two weeks a new piece on runic divination from my Galdr-Book. I hesitate to propose any sort of posting schedule for this at all, due to the work itself being unfinished, but recently I’ve been extremely cognizant of just how little time I have to learn and teach, just because the breadth and depth of the topics I want to explore is so enormous. No matter how much understanding I achieve in this lifetime, I will undoubtedly reach the end of it wishing I had learned more.

Sorry. I don’t mean to be morbid or depressing. The point of this article is to uplift, not to bring others down. With that goal in mind, I happily present the fruits of tonight’s labor, which is essentially a set of (offered, not demanding) instructions on how to get yourself into a good state of mind for divining and conversing with whatever divine forces you choose to connect with. Especially if you’re having trouble manifesting that connection, this guide is for you. It is all based on my personal experiences, so I can say for certain that my methods work for one person at the very least. If I’ve done my job right, they will work for you too.

In the reading of runes, one seeks to attain mysterious and divine knowledge—from the gods, from dead relatives, from local spirits, or from the Akashic record itself, if you believe in that sort of thing. If one wishes to seek out what is hidden, a good state of mind for finding and interpreting information must be maintained. This can be achieved through what is ideally a series of consecutive actions, which are as follows. (Please note that I do not wish to present this as the only valid method, though; there are as many methods as there are people who practice runic divination.)

Continue reading “My Method for Achieving the Best Possible Frame of Mind for Runic Divination (Bragiteilen’s Galdrbook)”

Quotations on Pre-Christian Spirituality

“Whatever Their Enlarged and Numerous Senses Could Perceive” (Quotations on Pre-Christian Spirituality)

William Blake - God Judging Adam
God Judging Adam (William Blake)

In The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, the visionary poet and painter William Blake gave a succinct and powerful statement of the changes in religious worldview that occurred in the ancient world.

“The ancient Poets animated all sensible objects with Gods or Geniuses, calling them by the names and adorning them with the properties of woods, rivers, mountains, lakes, cities nations, and whatever their enlarged and numerous senses could perceive. And particularly they studied the genius of each city and country, placing it under its mental deity. Till a system was formed, which some took advantage of & enslaved the vulgar by attempting to realize or abstract the mental deities from their objects: thus began Priesthood. Choosing forms of worship from poetic tales. And at length they pronounced that the Gods had ordered such things. Thus men forgot that All deities reside in the human breast.”

The poet is talking about a loss of perception: “whatever their enlarged and numerous senses could perceive.” This loss resulted from the gradually increasing emphasis, started by the Greeks and continued with Christianity, on abstract conceptions of deity rather than on the direct, sensory perception of and communication with spirits that was the norm in polytheistic animism. The exceptions are the gnostics, and mystics and clairsentient poets, who cultivated and celebrated direct perception and sensuous awareness of the sacred aliveness of creation.

– Ralph Metzner, The Well of Remembrance: Rediscovering the Earth Wisdom Myths of Northern Europe

This is a perfect illustration of why it is only through a combination of revivalism and reconstructionism that pre-Christian religions will be able to prosper again. This combination will allow us to connect the old deities with the mechanical era in which we find ourselves, and to reconnect them with the natural world that is their homeland. So, if you maintain a UPG (unverified personal gnosis) that a certain deity is connected to traffic lights or factory work, but hesitate to make the connection public without tempering it through a process of more abstract association with pre-existing correspondences, don’t. If you see a god in those traffic lights? Well, all that means is that that’s one more place in the world where they can be found.

© Alixander F. D. Bragiteilen and Bragiteilen.com, 2018. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Alixander F. D. Bragiteilen and Bragiteilen.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.